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This week I met with Maritess Inieto. We had met and chatted with each other before, but this is the first time we’ve gotten to know each other a bit more and done a classmate conversation. Maritess is a third year student at CSULB, majoring in Biology; she hopes to be a dentist. She is from the Bay Area, loves dogs (she wants three in the future), and likes to hang out with her friends or go out with her boyfriend in her free time. She loves Target, her favorite color is white, skin care is important to her, and she loves music and singing even though she is “not very good at it.” Which I disagree with; I think anyone can sing well if they try hard enough and find the right key. “If you can talk, you can sing…”

In regards to the Question of the Week, Maritess thinks college will be much harder and more competitive in 20 years. Because damn near all schools (as well as most of their majors) are impacted, it may be difficult for you to do what you truly want to. Maritess says that she’d like to say that there will be better professors in the future, and that everyone can get their desired classes and graduate on time–but that’s just her thinking positively.

Iiiiiiiiii…was much less serious when it came to this topic. On my ID card, I just drew a school desk with one leg slightly shorter than the other three legs. That’s my idea of college in 20 years–every desk will be slightly unstable (and I guess everyone is just fine with that in the future?). It wasn’t until I later realized that I had to be a bit more serious that I drew the desk with a touchscreen computer on it. I did this because I do actually think that that may be a possibility; technology is advancing and becoming more and more necessary for day-to-day life every day. While desks with computers in them would probably be rather expensive, I do think that schools will incorporate more modern (or advanced, depending on one’s perspective) technology in the classroom. Students need access to proper, functioning technology in order to do their work.

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